Getting Started with Arduino® Hardware

Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware enables you to create and run Simulink models on Arduino board. The target includes a library of Simulink blocks for configuring and accessing Arduino sensors, actuators and communication interfaces. Additionally, the target enables you to monitor and tune algorithms running on Arduino board from the same Simulink models from which you developed the algorithms.

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Communicating with Arduino® Hardware

Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware enables you to monitor and tune algorithms running on Arduino board from the same Simulink® models from which you developed the algorithms.

In this example you will learn how to tune and monitor the algorithm in real time as it is executing. When you are developing algorithms, it is often necessary to determine appropriate values of critical algorithm parameters in an iterative fashion. For example, a surveillance algorithm that measures motion energy in a room may use a threshold to determine an intruder in the presence of ambient noise. If the threshold value is set too low, the algorithm may erroneously interpret any movement as an intruder. If the threshold value is set too high, the algorithm may not be able to detect any movement at all. In such cases, the right threshold value may be obtained by trying different values until the desired algorithm performance is reached. This iterative process is called parameter tuning.

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Servo Control

Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware enables you to create and run Simulink® models on Arduino board. The target includes a library of Simulink blocks for configuring and accessing Arduino sensors, actuators and communication interfaces.

In this example you will learn how to create Simulink model that controls a standard servo motor. In a standard servo motor, the shaft position can be precisely set, usually between 0 and 180 degrees. Servo motors are used in many industrial, military and consumer applications and products.

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Using Ethernet Shield with Arduino® Hardware

Simulink Support Package for Arduino hardware enables you to create and run Simulink® models on Arduino board. The target includes a library of Simulink blocks for configuring and accessing Arduino sensors, actuators, and communication interfaces.

In this example you will learn how to create Simulink models receiving TCP/IP or UDP messages from a remote host and sending TCP/IP or UDP messages to a remote host, identified with a unique IP address and port number.

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Using WiFi Shield with Arduino® Hardware

Simulink Support Package for Arduino hardware enables you to create and run Simulink® models on Arduino board. The target includes a library of Simulink blocks for configuring and accessing Arduino sensors, actuators, and communication interfaces.

In this example, you will learn how to create Simulink models receiving TCP/IP or UDP messages from a remote host and sending TCP/IP or UDP messages to a remote host, identified with a unique IP address and port number.

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Read temperature from an I2C based sensor using Arduino® Hardware

Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware enables you to use the I2C interface to communicate with I2C based devices.

In this example, you will learn how to communicate to the Sparkfun digital temperature sensor TMP102. This sensor is interfaced with the Arduino board using the I2C bus. By default, it will send a 12-bit temperature value with a resolution of 0.0625 degree Celsius. You can configure this sensor to an Extended mode that provides 13-bit temperature measurements. For more details about the device, refer to the TMP102 datasheet.

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Communicating with an SPI based EEPROM using Arduino® Hardware

Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware enables you to use the SPI interface to communicate with SPI based devices.

In this example, you will learn how to communicate to an EEPROM interfaced to the Arduino board via SPI. The example uses the 256kB “ON Semiconductor EEPROM CAT25256”. This device uses a standard SPI protocol that is common to many other EEPROMs provided by different vendors. Make sure yours is compatible to the one used in this example. For more details about the device, refer to the CAT25256 datasheet.

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Code Verification and Validation with PIL

In this example you will learn how to configure a Simulink model to run Processor-In-the-Loop (PIL) simulation. In a PIL simulation, the generated code runs on target hardware. The results of the PIL simulation are transferred to Simulink to verify the numerical equivalence of the simulation and the code generation results. The PIL verification process is a crucial part of the design cycle to ensure that the behavior of the deployment code matches the design.

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Drive with PID Control

In a vehicle using independent wheel control, applying the same power to each wheel generally does not result in the vehicle moving straight. This is caused by mechanical and surface differences experienced by each of the wheels. To reduce deviation in the vehicle heading, a better approach is to use a closed-loop controller which adjusts the power applied to two motors based on the difference in their rates of rotation. One such controller is a well-known proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller.

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Line Follower Application for Arduino® Robot

Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware enables you to create and run Simulink models on Arduino Robot. This Robot has two Leonardo (ATmega32u4) based boards: Arduino Robot Motor Board and Arduino Robot Control Board. The Arduino Robot Control Board has peripherals such as Analog Input Pins, Digital Input/ Output Pins, PWM, Keypad, Potentiometer (POT), Compass, Buzzer, etc. The Arduino Robot Motor Board has peripherals such as Analog Input Pins, Digital Input/ Output Pins, PWM, Motor Driver, Motors, Wheels, Trimming Potentiometer (TRIM), IR sensors, etc. For more details, refer to the Arduino Robot website.

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Arduino Ethernet – Pushing data to a (PHP) server

In a previous article, I demonstrated how to use “Data Pull” to read sensor data over a computer network using an Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield/module and some sensors (DS18B20 for example). In this article we will do the opposite: Data Push. This means that we will make the Arduino send data to our server, which stored the results in a database. For this we will use an Apache, MySQL and PHP setup, which can be a full-size web-server or an easy to install “WAMPServer” setup on your desktop or laptop computer. Some basic experience with PHP and web-servers will be helpful when working your way through this article.

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Simulink Support Package for Arduino Hardware

Simulink® Support Package for Arduino® Hardware enables you to create and run Simulink models on Arduino boards. The support package includes a library of Simulink blocks for configuring and accessing Arduino sensors, actuators, and communication interfaces. It also enables you to interactively monitor and tune algorithms developed in Simulink as they run on Arduino.

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Registradores de porta

Registradores de porta permitem uma manipulação de baixo nível e mais rápida dos pinos de entrada e saída do microcontrolador de uma placa Arduino. Os chips usados nas placas Arduino (ATmega8 e ATmega168) têm três portas:

B (pinos digitais de 8 a 13)
C (pinos de entrada analógica)
D (pinos digitais de 0 a 7)

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Arduino – Introdução aos GPIOs

Este é o primeiro post de uma série que espero publicar. Apesar do título Arduino, o foco será no desenvolvimento em C no ambiente Atmel Studio 6 para o microcontrolador ATMEGA 2560.

O objetivo deste primeiro material é apresentar ao leitor as principais referências para explorar a plataforma Arduino e abordar a configuração dos registradores de GPIO, antes de passar ao “hands-on” . No próximo post veremos como criar um projeto no ambiente da Atmel para o desenvolvimento em C/C++ e colocaremos em prática o assunto aqui estudado.

É indicutível o sucesso do projeto Arduino pelo mundo todo, que conquistou hobbistas, geeks, amadores e profissionais. Por trás das conhecidas boards Arduino estão microcontroladores da Atmel e uma linguagem a elas dedicada. Mas o que afinal é Arduino? Em poucas palavras, é uma plataforma de prototipagem opensource que pode ser programada através de uma linguagem própria, a Arduino programming language. Entretanto, sua concepção não impede que se desenvolva utilizando assembly ou C/C++. Os requisitos para tal é dispor de um compilador para a arquitetura/microcontrolador utilizado.

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